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    23742

    CHILDREN UNDER 5 TREATED

    17186

    CHILDREN UNDER 5 RECIVED MALARIA CARE

    3067

    PEOPLE TREATED FOR CHOLERA

    POPULATION

    79,000,000

    million


    INFANT AND CHILD MORTALITY

    71

    deaths per 1,000 children


    MATERNAL MORTALITY

    693

    deaths per 100,000 births

    COUNTRY CONTEXT

    The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), the second largest country in Africa, is faced with a precarious health situation that requires medical and humanitarian support. Rich in natural resources, the DRC has been center stage for conflicts since the early 1990s. This gave rise to the substantial displacement of people and led to the destruction of health care facilities and public services. Cholera, measles and malaria epidemics are common throughout the entire country. The infant mortality rate of the country – 71 deaths per 1,000 – is one of the highest in the world.

    DRC - Alima

    OPERATIONS

    ALIMA has been working in Katanga province since late 2013 through RUSH, an emergency intervention team. The team was designed to address epidemics such as cholera and other epidemiological emergencies (measles, malaria), and improve sanitary conditions and access to potable water.

    RUSH also ensures epidemiological monitoring in 68 health zones. When there is an epidemic, it deploys an evaluation mission within 72 hours to assess the needs and launch an intervention.

    In 2016, RUSH led nine investigatory missions from 31 alerts and launched four interventions in Moba, Kalemie/Nyemba, Kinkondja and Kilwa health zones, including emergency interventions to combat cholera, measles, and malaria. The medical teams treated 25,300 patients, of which 23,140 suffered from malaria.


    Following an increase in the average annual number of cholera cases reported in the provinces along the Congo river, ALIMA launched an intervention in the Maniema and Tshopo provinces in November and December which enabled nearly 500 patients to be treated.