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    • Burkina Faso
    • Burkina Faso
    • Burkina Faso
    Burkina Faso

    Burkina Faso

    Burkina Faso
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    5889

    MALNOURISHED CHILDREN TREATED

    6661

    TOTAL CHILDREN UNDER 5 TREATED

    11864

    MOTHERS TRAINED TO SCREEN FOR MALNUTRITION

    POPULATION

    18,900,000

    millions

    MATERNAL MORTALITY RATE

    89

    deaths per 100,000 births

    INFANT AND CHILD MORTALITY RATE

    371

    deaths per 1,000 births

    COUNTRY CONTEXT

    Located in an arid band of the Sahel, Burkina Faso is in a highrisk zone for contagious diseases such as meningitis and measles, and experiences high rates of malaria. Poor food security means children suffer from chronic nutritional crises. In 2016, the global acute malnutrition rate was 8.2% in Yako and 6.5% in Bousse. The rate of severe acute malnutrition was 1.9% in Yako and 1.2% in Bousse. The most common causes of childhood mortality are malaria, respiratory infections, and diarrhea, all of which are exacerbated by malnutrition.

    OUR PARTNERS

    Since 2012, ALIMA has been working alongside two local NGOs, Keoogo which works to protect vulnerable children, and SOS Médecins BF, a medical NGO that specializes in emergency medical response, care for HIV/AIDS patients and health services to prisoners. ALIMA and the Keoogo/SOS Médecins consortium work together with the Ministry of Health. Training programs are regularly organized to help improve the quality of care in a more sustainable way.

    Burkina Faso - Alima

    OPERATIONS

    ALIMA and its partners supported 82 health centers in the health districts of Yako (Northern region) and Bousse (Central region) in 2016, by providing services such as hospitalization for malaria and severe malnutrition, as well as ambulatory care. More than 940 children suffering from severe acute malnutrition were hospitalized and more than 4,600 were treated with ambulatory care. 

    ALIMA/Keoogo/SOS Médecins teams helped support a campaign to administer Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC) therapy, which protected 32,000 children between the age of three months and five years from malaria in Bousse and more than 78,000 children in Yako. Thanks to SMC, a significant decrease in the number of simple and severe malaria cases was reported.

     In addition to direct medical care, as part of the “MUAC for Mothers” campaign, more than 55,080 mothers were trained to detect malnutrition in their children using a simple, color coded bracelet called a MUAC arm band (mid-upper arm circumference).

    Following the declaration of an outbreak of dengue fever by Burkina Faso’s Ministry of Health in November 2016, ALIMA/SOS Médecins/Keoogo began offering free care to dengue patients at the Yalgado Ouedraogo University Hospital and two other district
    hospitals in Ouagadougou. More than 70 suspected cases were admitted for inpatient treatment between November 18 and December 26. ALIMA and its partners also supplied 2,100 rapid diagnostic tests and trained nearly 300 health care workers on dengue fever detection and care.

    In November 2016, ALIMA also began a study in Yako called “MUAC Only treatment”. In addition to early screening using the “MUAC for Mothers” model, the research includes using MUAC as the sole anthropometric criteria for admission into the acute malnutrition treatment program, while expanding the admission threshold and introducing a gradual reduction in therapeutic food rations based on MUAC status. The aim is to establish whether this streamlined acute malnutrition treatment protocol will allow us to double the number of children receiving treatment at the earliest stage of malnutrition without significant cost increase while maintaining quality standards for a well-functioning nutrition program in terms of proportion of children cured and program coverage.